Monday, April 6, 2015

Palliative Care - Diffusing the Health Innovation

A graduate student in a Health Policy program asked me during a Q&A session at a national colloquium why I characterize end-of-life care in this country as three parts potential for two parts accomplishment. I've been asked similar questions before, but what gave me pause this time was the context of the query (the workshop was addressing the issue of access to hospice). The previous speaker had just presented a strong case statement on why access to hospice has been threatened by the "cap". And why the main reason for the decelerating growth of hospice was poor reimbursement.
I replied that the delivery system for late-life care is fragmented, and there is insufficient collaboration among providers within most communities. Thus, conditions are uninviting for the "spread of the science" (palliative medicine and nursing).


 The Center to Advance Palliative Care (CAPC) has effectively spread the science throughout the hospital sector, as it relates to hospital-based palliative care services. No small accomplishment, to be sure. But the other major palliative care providers (hospices) have been slow to scale, in part because hospices have taken competitive stances to protect their market share rather than the collaborative approach which studies have shown to be more conducive to the dissemination of best practices.  Communities known as providing high-value late-life care are characterized by several attributes - one of the most defining is a coalition (some might say network) of palliative care stakeholders (organizations and individuals) which come together to deliver care across settings and boundaries. The beginning of an Accountable Palliative Care Organization (APCO), some speculate.



The structure of the social system can facilitate or impede the diffusion of health care innovation, concluded Thoms Bodenheimmer, MD, in a September 2007 report for the California Health Care Foundation on how innovations in health care become the norm. Do the current social systems in our communities best position HPM leaders to 'spread the science"? As always, your comments are invited.

2 comments:

Alisa said...

Helpful information.Good job.I appreciate your effortsspecialist palliative care service

John said...

Innovation is so important when it comes to healthcare. StoriiCare is a great example of how a company is disrupting the industry to change the focus to person-centred care